Movement for the Abolition of Prostitution

What is the Nordic Model?

The Nordic Model (sometimes known as the Sex Buyer Law) is an approach to prostitution that has also been adopted in Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Canada, and France. It has several elements:

1. Decriminalisation of those who are prostituted

Prostitution is inherently violent. Women should not be criminalised for the exploitation and abuse they endure.

2. Buying sex becomes a criminal offence

Buying human beings for sex is harmful, exploitative and can never be safe. We need to reduce the demand that drives sex trafficking.

3. Support and exit services

High quality, non-judgemental services to support those in prostitution and help them build a new life outside it, including: access to safe affordable housing; training and further education; child care; legal, debt and benefit advice; emotional and psychological support.

A holistic approach

A public information campaign; training for police and CPS; tackling the inequality and poverty that drive people into prostitution; effective laws against pimping and sex trafficking, with penalties that reflect the enormous damage they cause.

(more…)

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Latest Posts

Janice Williams draws comparisons between Pokemon Go and prostitution. Is it just that they are both called ‘The Game’ or do the similarities go deeper?

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Janice Williams reports from the 29 September 2016 event on prostitution policy organised by the Public Policy Exchange. “We were overwhelmingly outnumbered by those working in the so-called Harm Reduction sector which perpetuates prostitution while purporting to ameliorate some of its worst harms (a bit).”

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We’ve just taken delivery of the first batch of our new business cards. The front has a beautiful quotation from Geena Leigh’s submission to the Australian Government’s 2015 inquiry into the regulation of brothels.

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This is the text of a written submission to the Liberal Democrats’ consultation on their “Sex Work” policy. It was submitted by Nordic Model Now! jointly with eighteen other groups that work for women’s rights and development, and/or to resist the objectification of women and girls, and male violence against women and children.

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Review of Ken Loach’s 2016 film ‘I, Daniel Blake’, focusing on the role that prostitution plays in the life of Katie, a young single mum. We meet her as she moves with her two young children into a council house in Newcastle, far away from her supportive mum and auntie.

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In September and October 2016, UN Women ran a consultation on “sex work, the sex trade and prostitution”. This is the text of the submission that Nordic Model Now! made to that consultation jointly with 13 other UK-based groups.

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Survivors’ Testimony

Prostitution Survivors' Testimony

Wendy Barnes

Two excerpts from Wendy Barnes’ brilliant book “And Life Continues: Sex Trafficking and My Journey to Freedom”, in which she tells the story of how she became a victim of human trafficking, why she was unable to leave the man who enslaved her for fifteen years, and the obstacles she overcame to heal and rebuild her life after she was rescued

Cathy

As told to Roseanne Downton. Identifying details have been changed to preserve privacy.

“I was born in the 1950s into an ordinary working class family in a city in Yorkshire. I left school with a couple of O levels, landed a pleasant job in a nice little chocolate factory. I didn’t get on with my parents, left home, and rented a little flat. Life was fabulous and carefree. I went out most nights with my girl workmates or on dates. []

Beth

“My name is Beth, I was a prostitute for five years. I never thought it would happen to me, but debt and almost becoming homeless can drive people to do things they usually wouldn’t do.

I had a good understanding with my clients but eventually I got a violent one. I was badly beaten up, raped and had my ribs cracked.

A friend got me away and put me up till I was OK. I gave up and moved back to my parents home and used debt consolidation to end my debt. 

Rebecca Mott

“I speak as a radical exited woman who cannot debate when I see and know of a constant genocide of the prostituted class being made normal. This is a genocide that is made invisible by the sex trade profiteers who will replace the dead or discarded prostituted by yet more vulnerable women and girls.

The reason I fight so relentlessly is to speak to the source of this genocide – speak to the creators of this genocide, and speak to who gains from silencing of this horror. 

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